scientific knowledge

TOWARD A SEMANTIC APPROACH IN EPISTEMOLOGY (pages 531-543)

Submitted by logos on Fri, 12/28/2012 - 10:45
paper title: 

TOWARD A SEMANTIC APPROACH IN EPISTEMOLOGY (pages 531-543)

paper type: 
article
paper author: 

Arnold CUSMARIU

paper author family name: 

CUSMARIU

paper abstract: 

ABSTRACT: Philosophers have recognized for some time the usefulness of semantic conceptions of truth and belief. That the third member of the knowledge triad, evidence, might also have a useful semantic version seems to have been overlooked. This paper corrects that omission by defining a semantic conception of evidence for science and mathematics and then developing a semantic conception of knowledge for these fields, arguably mankind’s most important knowledge repository. The goal is to demonstrate the advantages of having an answer to the more modest question “What is necessary and sufficient for introducing a knowledge predicate into scientific and mathematical languages?” – as contrasted with the ambitious Platonic question “What is knowledge?” After presenting the theory, the paper responds to a wide range of objections stemming from traditional philosophical concerns. 

paper issue: 
10
paper title: 

THE LOGICAL LIMITS OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE: HISTORICAL AND INTEGRATIVE PERSPECTIVES (pages 193-227)

paper type: 
article
paper author: 

Ettore DE MONTE, Antonino TAMBURELLO

paper author family name: 

DE MONTE, TAMBURELLO

paper abstract: 

ABSTRACT: This work investigates some of the most important logical limits of scientific knowledge. We argue that scientific knowledge is based on different logical forms and paradigms. The logical forms, which represent the rational structure of scientific knowledge, show their limits through logical antinomies. The paradigms, which represent the scientific points of view on the world, show their limits through the theoretical anomalies. When these limits arise in science and when scientists become fully and deeply aware of them, they can determine logical or paradigmatic revolutions. These are different in their respective courses, although the logical forms and the paradigms are parts of the same type of knowledge. In the end, science can avoid or can integrate its different limits. In fact, the limits of science can become new opportunities for its growth and development. 

paper issue: 
8

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