justification

INFINITISM AND PRACTICAL CONDITIONS ON JUSTIFICATION (pages 191-209)

Submitted by logos on Tue, 06/28/2011 - 16:35
paper title: 

INFINITISM AND PRACTICAL CONDITIONS ON JUSTIFICATION (pages 191-209)

paper type: 
article
paper author: 

Jeremy FANTL

paper author family name: 

FANTL

paper abstract: 

ABSTRACT: This paper brings together two recent developments in the theory of epistemic justification: practical conditions on justification, and infinitism (the view that justification is a matter of having an infinite series of non-repeating reasons). Pragmatic principles can be used to argue that, if we’re looking for an ‘objective’ theory of the structure of justification – a theory that applies to all subjects independently of their practical context – infinitism stands the only chance at being the correct theory.

paper issue: 
4
paper title: 

THE ORIGIN OF THE ‘GETTIER’ PROBLEM: SOCRATES AND THE THEAETETUS (pages 51-66)

paper type: 
article
paper author: 

Michael JENKINS

paper author family name: 

JENKINS

paper abstract: 

ABSTRACT:This article discusses the origin of what has become known as the Gettier Problem. It examines the claim put forward, though not expounded or defended, by J. Angelo Corlett in Analyzing Social Knowledge that the basis for Edmund Gettier’s article “Is Justified True Belief Knowledge?” was originally argued for in Plato’s Theaetetus. In his article, Gettier argues that the Justified True Belief condition is not sufficient for knowledge. However, Corlett questions the originality of this argument. This article examines Gettier’s article followed by the Theatetus. After which, the two articles are compared, and the claim is shown to be correct in accusing Gettier of failing consider the full work of the Theaetetus.  Socrates also argued that the Justified True Belief condition was not sufficient for knowledge. However, this article concludes by arguing that Socrates went further with his examination than Gettier did. Socrates not only put forward the claim that this condition was insufficient for knowledge, he also tried to supply answers to the problem.

paper issue: 
3

SELF-EVIDENCE (pages 325-352)

Submitted by logos on Mon, 12/27/2010 - 23:03
paper title: 

SELF-EVIDENCE (pages 325-352)

paper type: 
article
paper author: 

Carl GINET

paper author family name: 

Ginet

paper abstract: 

ABSTRACT: This paper develops an account of what it is for a proposition to be selfevident to someone, based on the idea that certain propositions are such that to fully understand them is to believe them. It argues that when a proposition p is self-evident to one, one has non-inferential a priori justification for believing that p and, a welcome feature, a justification that does not involve exercising any special sort of intuitive faculty; if, in addition, it is true that p and there exists no reason to believe that the proposition that p is incoherent, then one knows a priori that p. The paper argues that certain deeply contingent truths, e.g., the truth that I would now express by saying “I exist”, can be self-evident to, and thus known a priori by, the person they are about at the time they are about; but, since they cannot be known a priori, or even expressed, by anyone else or at any other time, they should not count as a priori truths.

paper pdf: 
paper issue: 
2

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